On This Day, Aug. 27, 1990 – Stevie Ray Vaughn Dies in Helicopter Crash

 

1990 – Stevie Ray Vaughn and three members of Eric Clapton’s band were killed in a helicopter crash in Wisconsin.

The helicopter, owned by Omni Flight Helicopters Inc., crashed into a hill shortly after midnight after taking off in dense fog, said Bill Bruce, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.

Mr. Vaughan is perhaps best known for his album, ”Couldn’t Stand the Weather,” released in 1984. In 1985 Mr. Vaughan shared a Grammy Award with other musicians for the Album, ‘‘Blues Explosion,” in the traditional blues category. He also won a Grammy Award this year in the contemporary category, for his album, ”In Step.”

Air crashes have killed several prominent rock performers over the years, including Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, Otis Redding, Jim Croce and Ricky Nelson.


 

1660 – The books of John Milton were burned in London due to his attacks on King Charles II.

1789 – The Declaration of the Rights of Man was adopted by the French National Assembly.

1858 – The first cabled news dispatch was sent and was published by “The New York Sun” newspaper. The story was about the peace demands of England and France being met by China.

1859 – The first oil well was successfully drilled in the U.S. by Colonel Edwin L. Drake near Titusville, PA.

1889 – Boxer Jack “Nonpareil” Dempsey was defeated for the first time of his career by George LaBlanche.

1894 – The Wilson-Gorman Tariff Act was passed by the U.S. Congress. The provision within for a graduated income tax was later struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.

1921 – The owner of Acme Packing Company bought a pro football team for Green Bay, WI. J.E. Clair paid tribute to those who worked in his plant by naming the team the Green Bay Packers. (NFL)

1938 – Robert Frost, in a fit of jealousy, set fire to some papers to disrupt a poetry recital by another poet, Archibald MacLeish.

1939 – Nazi Germany demanded the Polish corridor and Danzig.

1945 – American troops landed in Japan after the surrender of the Japanese government at the end of World War II.

1962Mariner 2 was launched by the United States. In December of the same year the spacecraft flew past Venus. It was the first space probe to reach the vicinity of another planet.

1965 – Bob Dylan’s second electric album, “Highway 61 Revisited,” was released.

1972 – North Vietnam’s major port at Haiphong saw the first bombings from U.S. warplanes.

1984 – President Ronald Reagan announced that the first citizen to go into space would be a teacher. The teacher that was eventually chosen was Christa McAuliffe. She died in the Challenger disaster on January 28, 1986.

1991 – The Soviet republic of Moldavia declared its independence.

1996California Governor Pete Wilson signed an order that would halt state benefits to illegal immigrants.

1999 – The final crew of the Russian space station Mir departed the station to return to Earth. Russia was forced to abandon Mir for financial reasons.

Source: On-This-Day.com, nytimes.com

 

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