On This Day, Feb 27, 1973,Lakota activists sieze Wounded Knee


1801 – The city of Washington, DC, was placed under congressional jurisdiction. 

1827 – New Orleans held its first Mardi Gras celebration. 

1861 – In Warsaw, Russian troops fired on a crowd protesting Russian rule over Poland. Five protesting marchers were killed in the incident. 

Unknown1896The Charlotte Observer published a picture of an X-ray photograph made by Dr. H.L. Smith. The photograph showed a perfect picture of all the bones of a hand and a bullet that Smith had placed between the third and fourth fingers in the palm. 

1900 – In South Africa, the British received an unconditional surrender from Boer Gen. Piet Cronje at Paardeberg. 

1922 – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the 19th Amendment that guaranteed women the right to vote. 

1933 – The Reichstag, Germany’s parliament building in Berlin, was set afire. The Nazis accused Communist for the fire. 

1939 – The U.S. Supreme Court outlawed sit-down strikes. 

1949 – Chaim Weizmann became the first Israeli president. 

1951 – The 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, limiting U.S. Presidents to two terms. 

 

1970 – Jefferson Airplane was fined $1,000 for using profanity during a concert in Oklahoma City. 

 

wknee73-11_19a1973 – The American Indian Movement occupied Wouned Knee in South Dakota.

On February 27, 1973, a team of 200 Oglala Lakota (Sioux) activists and members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized control of a tiny town with a loaded history — Wounded Knee, South Dakota. They arrived in town at night, in a caravan of cars and trucks, took the town’s residents hostage, and demanded that the U.S. government make good on treaties from the 19th and early 20th centuries. Within hours, police had surrounded Wounded Knee, forming a cordon to prevent protesters from exiting and sympathizers from entering. This marked the beginning of a 71-day siege and armed conflict.

The Pine Ridge reservation, where Wounded Knee was located, had been in turmoil for years. To many in the area the siege was no surprise. The Oglala Lakota who lived on the reservation faced racism beyond its boundaries and a poorly managed tribal government within them. In particular, they sought the removal of tribal chairman Dick Wilson, whom many Oglala living on the reservation thought corrupt.

 

Sources: OnThisDay.com; This Day in Music; The Atlantic