On This Day, June 2, 1935 – Babe Ruth Hangs Up His Spikes

1935 – Babe Ruth, one of the greatest players in the history of baseball, ends his Major League playing career after 22 seasons, 10 World Series and 714 home runs. The following year, Ruth, a larger-than-life figure whose name became synonymous with baseball, was one of the first five players inducted into the sport’s Hall of Fame.

Ruth made his Major League debut as a left-handed pitcher with the Red Sox in July 1914 and pitched 89 winning games for the team before 1920, when he was traded to the New York Yankees. In New York, Ruth’s primary position changed to outfielder and he led the Yankees to seven American League pennants and four World Series victories. Ruth was a huge star in New York and attracted so many fans that the team was able to open a new stadium in 1923, Yankee Stadium, dubbed “The House That Ruth Built.”

The southpaw slugger’s final season, in 1935, was with the Boston Braves. He had joined the Braves with the hope that he’d become the team’s manager the next season. However, this dream never came to pass for a disappointed Ruth, who had a reputation for excessive drinking, gambling and womanizing.

Many of the records Ruth set remained in place for decades. His career home run record stood until 1974, when it was broken by Hank Aaron. Ruth’s record of 60 home runs in a single season (1927) of 154 games wasn’t bested until 1961, when Roger Maris knocked out 61 homers in an extended season of 162 games. The Sultan of Swat’s career slugging percentage of .690 remains the highest in Major League history.

Ruth died of throat cancer at age 53 on August 16, 1948, in New York City. His body lay in state at Yankee Stadium for two days and was visited by over 100,000 fans.


1537 – Pope Paul III banned the enslavement of Indians.

1774 – The Quartering Act, which required American colonists to allow British soldiers into their houses, was reenacted.

1793 – Maximillian Robespierre initiated the “Reign of Terror”. It was an effort to purge those suspected of treason against the French Republic.

1851 – Maine became the first U.S. state to enact a law prohibiting alcohol.

1883 – The first baseball game under electric lights was played in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

1886 – Grover Cleveland became the second U.S. president to get married while in office. He was the first to have a wedding in the White House.


1904 – Johnny Weissmuller was born. An Olympic swimmer, he was the sixth actor to portray Tarzan in movies.


1910 – Charles Stewart Roll became the first person to fly non-stop and double cross the English Channel.

1924 -With Congress’ passage of the Indian Citizenship Act, the government of the United States confers citizenship on all Native Americans born within the territorial limits of the country.

Before the Civil War, citizenship was often limited to Native Americans of one-half or less Indian blood. In the Reconstruction period, progressive Republicans in Congress sought to accelerate the granting of citizenship to friendly tribes, though state support for these measures was often limited. In 1888, most Native American women married to U.S. citizens were conferred with citizenship, and in 1919 Native American veterans of World War I were offered citizenship. In 1924, the Indian Citizenship Act, an all-inclusive act, was passed by Congress. The privileges of citizenship, however, were largely governed by state law, and the right to vote was often denied to Native Americans in the early 20th century.

1928 – Nationalist Chiang Kai-shek captured Peking, China.

1933 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt accepted the first swimming pool to be built inside the White House.

1953 – Elizabeth was crowned queen of England at Westminster Abbey.

1954 – U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy charged that there were communists working in the CIA and atomic weapons plants.

1957 – Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was interviewed by CBS-TV.

1966 – Surveyor 1, the U.S. space probe, landed on the moon and started sending photographs back to Earth of the Moon’s surface. It was the first soft landing on the Moon.

1979 – Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the first visit by a pope to a Communist country.

1985 – Tommy Sandt was ejected from a major-league baseball game before the national anthem was played. He had complained to the umpire about a call against his team the night before.

1999 – In South Africa, the African National Congress (ANC) won a major victory. ANC leader Thabo Mbeki was to succeed Nelson Mandela as the nation’s president.

2003 – In the U.S., federal regulators voted to allow companies to buy more television stations and newspaper-broadcasting combinations in the same city. The previous ownership restrictions had not been altered since 1975.

2003 – William Baily was reunited with two paintings he had left on a subway platform. One of the works was an original Picasso rendering of two male figures and a recreation of Picasso’s “Guernica” by Sophie Matisse. Sophie Matisse was the great-granddaughter of Henri Matisse.

 

Source: On-This.Day.com; History.com 

 

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