On This Day, March 9, 1933 – Congress Begins Work on The New Deal

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1933 – The U.S. Congress began its 100 days of enacting New Deal legislation.

The New Deal was orchestrated by a core group of FDR advisors brought in from academia and industry known as the “Brains Trust” who, in their first “hundred days” in office, helped FDR enact fifteen major laws. One of the most significant of these was the Banking Act of 1933, which finally brought an end to the panic that gripped the nation’s banking system. The success of the Banking Act, depended in large measure on the willingness of the American people to once again place their faith—and money—in their local banks. To ensure this, FDR turned to the radio, and in the first of his many “fireside chats,” convinced the American people the crisis was over and that their deposits—backed by the newly established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) — were safe.

Other significant New Deal measures included the establishment of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA). The most famous measure of the New Deal was the 1935 Social Security Act, which led to the establishment of the Social Security Administration and the creation of a national system of old-age pensions and unemployment compensation.

The New Deal also led to the establishment of a number of significant regulatory agencies, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), as well as the National Labor Relations Board, the Civil Aeronautics Authority, and the Federal Communications Commission.

Critics of FDR’s policies, on both the right and the left, use this fact as a reason to condemn it. Conservatives argue, for example, that it went too far, and brought too much government intervention in the economy, while those on the left argue that it did not go far enough. But the New Deal’s greatest achievements transcend mere economic statistics and offered hope and restored the faith of the American people. It also transformed the federal government into an active instrument of social justice and established a network of laws and institutions designed to protect the American economy from the worst excesses of capitalism.


1454 – Amerigo Vespucci was born in Florence, Italy. Matthias Ringmann, a German mapmaker, named the American continent in his honor.

1788 – Connecticut became the 5th state to join the United States.

1793 – Jean Pierre Blanchard made the first balloon flight in North America. The event was witnessed by President George Washington.

1796 – Napoleon Bonaparte and Josephine de Beauharnais were married. They were divorced in 1809.

1820 – The U.S. Congress passed the Land Act that paved the way for westward expansion of North America.

1832 – Abraham Lincoln announced that he would run for a political office for the first time. He was unsuccessful in his run for a seat in the Illinois state legislature.

1839 – The French Academy of Science announced the Daguerreotype photo process.

1862 – During the U.S. Civil War, the ironclads Monitor and Virginia fought to a draw in a five-hour battle at Hampton Roads, Virginia.

1863 – General Ulysses Grant was appointed commander-in-chief of the Union forces.

1916 – Mexican raiders led by Pancho Villa attacked Columbus, New Mexico. 17 people were killed by the 1,500 horsemen.

1936 – The German press warned that all Jews who vote in the upcoming elections would be arrested.

1945 – During World War II, U.S. B-29 bombers launched incendiary bomb attacks against Japan.

1946 – The A.F.L. accused Juan Peron of using the army to establish a dictatorship over Argentine labor.

1954 – WNBT-TV (now WNBC-TV), in New York, broadcast the first local color television commercials. The ad was Castro Decorators of New York City.

1959 – Mattel introduced Barbie at the annual Toy Fair in New York.

1964 – Production began on the first Ford Mustang.

1965 – The first U.S. combat troops arrived in South Vietnam.


1969 – “The Smothers Brothers’ Comedy Hour” was canceled by CBS-TV.


1975 – Work began on the Alaskan oil pipeline.

1977 – About a dozen armed Hanafi Muslims invaded three buildings in Washington, DC. They killed one person and took more than 130 hostages. The siege ended two days later.

1983 – The official Soviet news agency TASS says that U.S. President Reagan is full of “bellicose lunatic anti-communism.”

1993 – Rodney King testified at the federal trial of four Los Angeles police officers accused of violating his civil rights. (California)

 

Source: On-This-Day.com; rooseveltinstitute.org

 

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