On This Day, Nov. 5, 1605 – Guy Fawkes Arrested in Gunpowder Plot

Guy Fawkes Night

1605 – In November 1605, the infamous Gunpowder Plot took place in which some Catholics, most famously Guy Fawkes,  plotted to blow up James I, the first of the Stuart kings of England. The story is remembered each November 5th when ‘Guys’ are burned in a celebration known as “Bonfire Night”.

The story appears to be very simple.

Catholics in England had expected James to be more tolerant of them. In fact, he had proved to be the opposite and had ordered all Catholic priests to leave England. This so angered some Catholics that they decided to kill James and put his daughter Elizabeth on the throne ensuring that she was a Catholic. This led to a plot to kill not only the king of England, James, but also everyone sitting in the Houses of Parliament at the same time as James was there when he opened Parliament on November 5th, 1605.

Guy Fawkes and his fellow conspirators, having rented out a house right by the Houses of Parliament,  managed to get 36 barrels of gunpowder into a cellar of the House of Lords.

The other conspirators were:

Robert and Thomas Wintour, 
Thomas Percy, 
Christopher and John Wright, 
Francis Tresham, 
Everard Digby, 
Ambrose Rookwood, 
Thomas Bates, 
Robert Keyes, 
Hugh Owen, 
John Grant and the man who is said to have organised the whole plot
Robert Catesby.

The explosive expert, Guy Fawkes, had been left in the cellars to set off the fuse. He was only caught when a group of guards decided to check the cellars at the last moment.

Fawkes was arrested and sent to the Tower of London where he was tortured and eventually gave away the names of the fellow conspirators. 

Sir William Wade, Lieutenant of the Tower, had orders to use whatever means of torture was required to get information from Fawkes. The order came from James. 

Of those involved, some were shot as they were chased by the law such as Percy and Catesby. Others were captured, sent to the Tower and, after a brief trial, eventually hung, drawn and quartered, with Fawkes, in January 1606. 


1844 – In California, a grizzly bear underwent a successful cataract operation at the Zoological Garden.

1872 – In the U.S., Susan B. Anthony was fined $100 for attempting to vote in the presidential election. She never paid the fine.

1895 – George B. Selden received the first U.S. patent for an automobile. He sold the rights for $200,000 four years later.

1935 – The game “Monopoly” was introduced by Parker Brothers Company.

1940 – President Franklin Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.

1946 – John F. Kennedy was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives at the age of 29.

1959 – The American Football League was formed.

1974 – Ella T. Grasso was elected governor of Connecticut. She was the first woman in the U.S. to win a governorship without succeeding her husband.

1984 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the NFL had exceeded antitrust limits in attempting to stop the Oakland Raiders from moving to Los Angeles.

1986 – The White House reaffirmed the U.S. ban on the sale of weapons to Iran.

1998 – Scientists published a genetic study that showed strong evidence that Thomas Jefferson fathered at least one child (Eston Hemings) of his slave, Sally Hemings.

1994 – Former President Ronald Reagan announced that he had Alzheimer’s disease.

1994 – George Foreman, 45, became boxing’s oldest heavyweight champion when he knocked out Michael Moorer in the 10th round of their WBA fight in Las Vegas.

2009 – At Fort Hood, near Kileen, TX, Nidal Malik Hasan killed 13 people and wounded 30 others.

 

Source: Historylearningsite.co.uk; On-This-Day.com