On This Day, Nov. 6, 1860 – Abraham Lincoln Elected President

Lincoln Memorian

1860 – Abraham Lincoln was elected to be the sixteenth president of the United States after securing the Republican Party presidential nomination as a moderate from a swing state. With very little support in the slave states, Lincoln swept the North and was elected president in 1860. His election prompted seven southern slave states to form the Confederacy before he took office.

“It follows from these views that no State upon its own mere motion can lawfully get out of the Union; that ‘resolves’ and ‘ordinances’ to that effect are legally void, and that acts of violence within any State or States against the authority of the United States are insurrectionary or revolutionary, according to circumstances.

I therefore consider that in view of the Constitution and the laws the Union is unbroken, and to the extent of my ability, I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins upon me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all the States. Doing this I deem to be only a simple duty on my part, and I shall perform it so far as practicable unless my rightful masters, the American people, shall withhold the requisite means or in some authoritative manner direct the contrary. I trust this will not be regarded as a menace, but only as the declared purpose of the Union that it ‘will’ constitutionally defend and maintain itself.

In doing this there needs to be no bloodshed or violence, and there shall be none unless it be forced upon the national authority. The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere. Where hostility to the United States in any interior locality shall be so great and universal as to prevent competent resident citizens from holding the Federal offices, there will be no attempt to force obnoxious strangers among the people for that object. While the strict legal right may exist in the Government to enforce the exercise of these offices, the attempt to do so would be so irritating and so nearly impracticable withal that I deem it better to forego for the time the uses of such offices.”

– From Lincoln’s inaugural address of 1861.


1789 – Father John Carroll was appointed as the first Roman Catholic bishop in the United States of America.

1832 – Joseph Smith, III, was born. He was the first president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was also the son of Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism.

1851 – Charles Henry Dow was born. He was the founder of Dow Jones & Company.

1861 – Jefferson Davis was elected as the president of the Confederacy in the U.S.

1869 – The first official intercollegiate football game was played in New Brunswick, NJ.

1913 – Mohandas K. Gandhi was arrested as he led a march of Indian miners in South Africa.

1923 – Jacob Schick was granted a patent for the electric shaver.

1935 – Edwin H. Armstrong announced his development of FM broadcasting.

1952 – The first hydrogen bomb was exploded at Eniwetok Atoll in the Pacific Ocean.

1962 – The U.N. General Assembly adopts a resolution that condemned South Africa’s racist apartheid policies. The resolution also called for all member states to terminate military and economic relations with South Africa.

1965 – The Freedom Flights program began which would allow 250,000 Cubans to come to the United States by 1971.

1967 – Phil Donahue began a TV talk show in Dayton, OH. The show was on the air for 29 years.

1975 – King Hassan II of Morocco launches the Green March, a mass migration of 300,000 unarmed Moroccans, that march into the nation of Western Sahara.

1977 – 39 people were killed when an earthen dam burst, sending a wall of water through the campus of Toccoa Falls Bible College in Georgia.

1984 – For the first time in 193 years, the New York Stock Exchange remained open during a presidential election day.

1985 – Leftist guerrillas belonging to Columbia’s April 19 Movement seized control of the Palace of Justice in Bogota.

1986 – U.S. intelligence sources confirmed a story run by the Lebanese magazine Ash Shiraa that reported the U.S. had been secretly selling arms to Iran in an effort to secure the release of seven American hostages.

1990 – About 20% of the Universal Studios backlot in southern California was destroyed in an arson fire.

1991 – Kuwait celebrated the dousing of the last of the oil fires ignited by Iraq during the Persian Gulf War.

1995 – Art Modell, the owner of the Cleveland Browns, announced plans to move his team to Baltimore.

1998 – The Islamic militant group Hamas exploded a car bomb killing the two attackers and injuring 21 civilians.

1999 – Australian voters rejected a referendum to drop Britain’s queen as their head of state.

2001 – In London, the “Lest We Forget” exhibit opened at the National Memorial Arboretum. Fred Seiker was the creator of the 24 watercolors. Seiker was a prisoner of war that had been forced to build the Burma Railroad, the “railway of death,” for the Japanese during World War II.

 

Source: presidency.ucsb.edu; On-This-Day.com; Wikipedia.org