On This Day, Oct. 23, 1956 – Hungarian Citizens Revolt Against Soviet Rule

stalin-statue-head-budapest-1956

1956 – Hungarian citizens began an uprising against Soviet occupation.

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was a spontaneous nationwide revolt against the government of the Hungarian People’s Republic and its Soviet-imposed policies. Though leaderless it was the first major threat to Soviet control since the USSR’s forces drove out the Nazis at the end of World War II and occupied Eastern Europe.

The revolt began as a student demonstration, which attracted thousands as they marched through central Budapest to the Parliament building, calling out on the streets using a van with loudspeakers via Radio Free Europe. When the students were fired on, one student died and was wrapped in a flag and held above the crowd. This was the start of the revolution.

As the news spread, disorder and violence erupted throughout the capital.

The revolt spread quickly across Hungary and the government collapsed. Thousands organised into militias, battling the ÁVH and Soviet troops. Pro-Soviet communists and ÁVH members were often executed or imprisoned and former prisoners were released and armed. A new government formally disbanded the ÁVH, declared its intention to withdraw from the Warsaw Pact, and pledged to re-establish free elections.

By the end of October, fighting had almost stopped and a sense of normality began to return.

After announcing a willingness to negotiate a withdrawal of Soviet forces, the Politburo changed its mind and moved to crush the revolution.

On 4 November, a large Soviet force invaded Budapest and other regions of the country. The Hungarian resistance continued until 10 November.

Over 2,500 Hungarians and 700 Soviet troops were killed in the conflict, and 200,000 Hungarians fled as refugees.


1910 – Blanche S. Scott became the first woman to make a public solo airplane flight in the United States.

1915 – Approximately 25,000 women demanded the right to vote with a march in New York City.

1930 – J.K. Scott won the first miniature golf tournament. The event was held in Chattanooga, TN.

1942 – During World War II, the British began a major offensive against Axis forces at El Alamein, Egypt.

1944 – During World War II, the Battle of Leyte Gulf began.

1946 – The United Nations General Assembly convened in New York for the first time.

1956 – NBC broadcasted the first videotape recording. The tape of Jonathan Winters was seen coast to coast in the U.S.

1958 – Russian poet and novelist Boris Pasternak was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. He was forced to refuse the honor due to negative Soviet reaction. Pasternak won the award for writing “Dr. Zhivago“.

1962 – During the Cuban Missile Crisis, the U.S. naval “quarantine” of Cuba was approved by the Council of the Organization of American States (OAS).

1962 – The U.S. Navy reconnaissance squadron VFP-62 began overflights of Cuba under the code name “Blue Moon.”

1971 – The U.N. General Assembly voted to expel Taiwan and seat Communist China.

1973President Richard M. Nixon agreed to turn over the subpoenaed tapes concerning the Watergate affair.

1978 – China and Japan formally ended four decades of hostility when they exchanged treaty ratifications.

1989 – Hungary became an independent republic, after 33 years of Soviet rule.

1992 – Japanese Emperor Akihito became the first Japanese emperor to stand on Chinese soil.

1998 – Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Chairman Yasser Arafat reach a breakthrough in a land-for-peace West Bank accord.

 

Source: Wikipedia.org; On-This-Day.com