On This Day, Oct. 25, 1854 – Light Brigade Rides into Fame and Death

Carga+Brigada+Ligera+Brigade+Light+Horses

Cannon to right of them,

Cannon to left of them,

Cannon in front of them

Volley’d & thunder’d;

Storm’d at with shot and shell,

Boldly they rode and well,

Into the jaws of Death,

Into the mouth of Hell Rode the six hundred.

1854 – The Charge of the Light Brigade took place during the Crimean War. The British were winning the Battle of Balaclava when Lord James Cardigan received an order to attack the Russians.

Lord Raglan, overall commander of the British forces, had intended to send the Light Brigade to pursue and harry a retreating Russian artillery battery, a task well suited to light cavalry. Due to miscommunication in the chain of command, the Light Brigade was instead sent on a frontal assault against a different artillery battery, one well-prepared with excellent fields of defensive fire.

Although the Light Brigade reached the battery under withering direct fire and scattered some of the gunners, the badly mauled brigade was forced to retreat immediately. Thus, the assault ended with very high British casualties and no decisive gains.

The events are best remembered as the subject of the poem “The Charge of the Light Brigade” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Published just six weeks after the event, its lines emphasize the valour of the cavalry in bravely carrying out their orders, regardless of the obvious outcome. Blame for the miscommunication has remained controversial, as the original order from Raglan itself was vague.


1415 – In Northern France, England won the Battle of Agincourt over France during the Hundred Years’ War. Almost 6000 Frenchmen were killed while fewer than 400 were lost by the English.

1812 – During the War of 1812, the U.S. frigate United States captured the British vessel Macedonian.

1870 – The first U.S. trademark was given. The recipient was the Averill Chemical Paint Company of New York City.

1881 – The founder of “Cubism,” Pablo Picasso, was born in Malaga, Spain.

1917 – The Bolsheviks (Communists) under Vladimir Ilyich Lenin seized power in Russia.

1929 – Albert B. Fall, of President Warren Harding‘s cabinet, was found guilty of taking a bribe. He was sentenced to a year in prison and fined $100,000.

1954 – A U.S. cabinet meeting was televised for the first time.

Radarange_first

1955 – The microwave oven, for home use, was introduced by The Tappan Company.

1958 – U.S. Marines withdrew from Beirut, Lebanon. They had been sent in on July 25, 1958, to protect the nation’s pro-Western government.

1960 – The Accutron watch by the Bulova Watch Company was introduced.

1962 – Ambassador Adlai Stevenson presented photographic evidence to the United Nations Security Council. The photos were of Soviet missile bases in Cuba.

1962 – American author John Steinbeck was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature.

1964 – The Rolling Stones made their first appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show.

1971 – The U.N. General Assembly voted to expel Taiwan and admit mainland China.

1983U.S. troops and soldiers from six Caribbean nations invaded Grenada to restore order and provide protection to U.S. citizens after a recent coup within Grenada’s Communist (pro-Cuban) government.

1990 – It was announced by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney that the Pentagon was planning to send 100,000 more troops to Saudi Arabia.

2001 – It was announced that scientists had unearthed the remains of an ancient crocodile which lived 110 million years ago. The animal, found in Gadoufaoua, Niger, grew as long as 40 feet and weighed as much as eight metric tons.

 

Source: On-This-Day.com; Wikipedia.org