On This Day, Sept. 23, 1952 – Richard Nixon Delivers the Checkers Speech

1952 – Richard Nixon gave his “Checkers Speech”. At the time he was a candidate for vice-president.

The Checkers speech or Fund speech was an address made on September 23, 1952 by the Republican vice presidential candidate, California Senator Richard Nixon. Nixon had been accused of improprieties relating to a fund established by his backers to reimburse him for his political expenses. With his place on the Republican ticket in doubt, he flew to Los Angeles and delivered a half-hour television address in which he defended himself, attacked his opponents, and urged the audience to contact the Republican National Committee (RNC) to tell it whether he should remain on the ticket. During the speech, he stated that regardless of what anyone said, he intended to keep one gift: a black-and-white dog who had been named Checkers by the Nixon children, thus giving the address its popular name.

Nixon’s speech was seen or heard by about 60 million Americans, including the largest television audience to that time, and led to an outpouring of public support. A huge majority of the millions of telegrams and phone calls received by the RNC and other political offices supported Nixon. He was retained on the ticket, which then swept to victory weeks later in November 1952.


 

1642 – The first commencement at Harvard College, in Cambridge, MA, was held.

1779 – John Paul Jones, commander of the American warship Bon Homme, was quoted as saying “I have not yet begun to fight!”

1780 – John Andre, a British spy, was captured with papers revealing that Benedict Arnold was going to surrender West Point, NY, to the British.

1806 – The Corps of Discovery, the Lewis and Clark expedition, reached St. Louis, MO, and ended the trip to the Pacific Northwest.

1838 – Victoria Chaflin Woodhull was born. She became the first female candidate for the U.S. Presidency.

1845 – The Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York was formed by Alexander Joy Cartwright. It was the first baseball team in America.

1846 – Astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle discovered the planet Neptune.

1912 – “Keystone Comedy” by Mack Sennett was released.

1930 – Flashbulbs were patented by Johannes Ostermeier.

1951 – The first transcontinental telecast was received on the west coast. The show “Crusade for Freedom” was broadcast by CBS-TV from New York.

1952 – The first Pay Television sporting event took place. The Marciano-Walcott fight was seen in 49 theaters in 31 cities.

1957 – Nine black students withdrew from Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas due to the white mob outside.

1962 – “The Jetsons” premiered on ABC-TV. It was the first program on the network to be carried in color.

1964 – The new ceiling painting of the Paris Opera house was unveiled. The work was done by Russian-born artist Marc Chagall.

1973 – Overthrown Argentine president Juan Peron was returned to power. He had been overthrown in 1955. His wife, Eva Duarte, was the subject of the musical “Evita.”

1986 – Japanese newspapers quoted Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone as saying that minorities lowered the “intelligence level” of America.

1990 – Iraq publicly threatened to destroy Middle East oil fields and to attack Israel if any nation tried to force it from Kuwait.

1991 – U.N. weapons inspectors find documents detailing Iraq’s secret nuclear weapons program. The find in Baghdad triggered a standoff with authorities in Iraq.

1993 – The Israeli parliament ratified the Israel-PLO accord.

1993 – Blacks were allowed a role in the South African government after a parliamentary vote.

1999 – A 17-month-old girl fell 230 feet from the Capilano Suspension Bridge in North Vancouver, British Columbia. The girl had bruises but no broken limbs from the fall onto a rocky ledge.

 

Source: On-This-Day.com; wikipedia.org