On this Day, Oct. 8, 1957 – Brooklyn Dodgers Announce Move to LA

1957 – The Brooklyn Baseball Club announced that it had accepted a deal to move the Dodgers to Los Angeles. When the decade started, the Dodgers had a new president, Walter O’Malley, who was originally appointed as the club’s attorney in 1941. In October of 1950, O’Malley became president and chief stockholder of the Dodgers, a position he would hold for 20 years. As the 1957 season rolled around, the team on the field was overshadowed by the publicity of the team’s possible move to the West Coast. Since the early part of the decade, O’Malley had wanted to build a more modern stadium for his ballclub in Brooklyn. New York officials were unable to come up with a suitable site. On October 8, 1957, O’Malley announced that after 68 seasons in Brooklyn, the Dodgers would be moving to Los Angeles. In a move to bring baseball to all...

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San Francisco, Oakland Are Suing Five Major Fossil Fuel Companies Over Climate Change

By Brianna Acuesta – They estimate that the costs will be in the billions. San Francisco and Oakland just became the first major U.S. cities to file a lawsuit against fossil fuel companies in an effort to hold them accountable for the effects of climate change that the two highly-populated cities have already begun experiencing. Both cities foresee major construction and damages in the near future that needs to be prevented or fixed, and they have pointed to Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, BP, and Royal Dutch Shell. These companies are among five of the biggest investor-owned fossil fuel companies. San Francisco city attorney Dennis Herrera and Oakland city attorney Barbara J. Parker each filed their own lawsuit on the same day, both citing that the fossil fuel companies have known about their part in climate change since at least the 1970s or 1980s. According to the lawsuits, the companies took this information, which was confirmed by outside...

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On This Day, May 28, 1957 – Owners Allow Dodgers and Giants to Move

On May 28, 1957, National League owners vote unanimously to allow the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers to move to San Francisco and Los Angeles, respectively, at the mid-season owner’s meeting in Chicago, Illinois. There were, however, conditions attached to the owners’ decision. First, either both teams had to move or neither could, which meant that if one team reconsidered, the other would have to change their plans as well. Second, both teams had to announce their plans before October 1, 1957. In the end, both teams did move: The Giants hosted a farewell party at a game on September 29, and the Dodgers formally announced their move on October 8. West Coast baseball fans were overjoyed, and the people of New York City were heartbroken. In 1957, the Dodgers were in the midst of an impressive run; they had won five pennants and one World Championship in...

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On This Day, May 27, 1937 – Golden Gate Bridge opens

San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, a stunning technological and artistic achievement, opens to the public after five years of construction. On opening day–“Pedestrian Day”–some 200,000 bridge walkers marveled at the 4,200-foot-long suspension bridge, which spans the Golden Gate Strait at the entrance to San Francisco Bay and connects San Francisco and Marin County. On May 28, the Golden Gate Bridge opened to vehicular traffic. The concept of bridging the nearly mile-wide Golden Gate Strait was proposed as early as 1872, but it was not until the early 1920s that public opinion in San Francisco began to favor such an undertaking. In 1921, Cincinnati-born bridge engineer Joseph Strauss submitted a preliminary proposal: a combination suspension-cantilever that could be built for $27 million. Although unsightly compared with the final result, his design was affordable, and Strauss became the recognized leader of the effort to bridge the Golden Gate Strait. During the...

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San Francisco Judges Dismiss 66,000 Arrest Warrants Against The City’s Homeless

by Whitney Webb – San Francisco chief judge John Stewart and his colleagues dismissed thousands of cases against the homeless for “quality-of-life” crimes such as sleeping on sidewalks because it “was the right thing to do.” The United States, despite often advertising itself as the world’s “most developed” nation, has a major problem with homelessness, with approximately 3.5 million currently living with no place to call home. Even though vacant houses outnumber the nation’s homeless by more than five to one, most of them end up sleeping in public places or out in the street. In cities around the country, the homeless are frequently criminalized as are those who offer them food and other forms of human kindness. Despite the widespread maltreatment of the homeless, judges in San Francisco have been dismissing thousands upon thousands of arrest warrants targeting the homeless because “it was the right thing to do.” Many...

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San Francisco Just Told Trump In No Uncertain Terms To Go F*ck Himself

by John Prager – Donald Trump hasn’t even stepped into office yet and he has already managed to fill his cabinet with the richest people ever to self-serve in that position, start an international incident with China, hire multiple white supremacists and other assorted bigots to top-level positions, and generally show us that the next four years will be a test of all that we are as Americans — and the city of San Francisco has already made it clear where they stand. Just before Thanksgiving, the city’s Board of Supervisors released an 11-point resolution telling Donald Trump that his hateful ideals are not welcome. The resolution reminds Trump and other assorted bigots that the city stands with the LGBT community, women, Muslims (including refugees) and people of all religions, African-Americans, and every other group sure to be marginalized and harassed under the Trump administration: WHEREAS, On November 8, 2016, Donald...

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Latest Attempt at Police Transparency Fails In California

by A.C. Thompson – As police scandals swirl in Northern California, a legislative effort to make the disciplinary records of officers available to the public comes up short There are numerous law enforcement scandals unfolding in Northern California. Last month, San Francisco fired its police chief after a string of officer-involved shootings and two separate episodes involving officers sending racist text messages to one another. In Oakland, the mayor recently ousted two police chiefs in the span of five days amid a widening investigation into allegations that 14 city officers — as well as law enforcement agents from at least three other jurisdictions — had sex with a teenage prostitute. And sheriff’s deputies and corrections officers in San Francisco, Alameda County, and Santa Clara County are facing criminal charges ranging from assault to murder. While this collection of ugly incidents will continue to generate headlines for months to come, many of...

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Counselors Punish Tennessee For Anti-LGBT Law By Moving Convention To San Francisco

by ZACK FORD – The American Counseling Association was planning to hold its 2017 national convention in Nashville, but after Tennessee lawmakers passed a law allowing for religious discrimination in counseling, the organization decided not to reward the state with its business. Last week, the ACA announced it would instead be heading to the “inclusive and inviting city” of San Francisco. The new Tennessee law ensures that any counselor or therapist can decide not to provide services to a client if doing so violates their religious beliefs. A lawsuit challenging its constitutionality points out that it flagrantly violates the ACA Code of Ethics, which the state had previously embraced as the standard for its counselors and therapists. Back in May, ACA officials announced that after hearing complaints from many members, they would move the convention somewhere else. “Of all the state legislation I have seen passed in my 30 years...

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San Francisco Finds Giving The Homeless Supportive Housing Costs Less Than Doing Nothing

by BRYCE COVERT – Putting the homeless in supportive housing, where they not only get a safe place to sleep but services that help them deal with any health or other issues, costs a lot up front. But San Francisco has found that once those in housing eventually get stabilized, it ends up costing less than it did to have them living on the streets or in shelters. The city began taking a “housing first” approach to homelessness in 2004, aiming to get the homeless into housing before trying to tackle any other issues. As part of that, it sought to get people into supportive housing units that are coupled with supports and services. In a new report analyzing the effort, it’s clear that the initial cost of housing this population and addressing their medical, mental, and other challenges is high. The service and housing costs for 1,818 homeless people jumped...

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San Francisco Police Chief Resigns After Fatal Shooting Of Unarmed Black Woman

by CARIMAH TOWNES – Shortly after an unarmed black woman was fatally shot by police in San Francisco, Police Chief Greg Suhr resigned at the urging of Mayor Ed Lee. The move comes days after Lee defended the chief’s leadership, despite a string of department scandals and months of protests calling for Suhr’s departure. The chief was to asked to step down Thursday, hours after a 27-year-old woman was killed by a sergeant attempting to remove her from a stolen vehicle. The fatal shooting occurred in the same neighborhood where Mario Woods was gunned down by five officers in December. According to Lee, Suhr was committed to reforming the department, but changes haven’t been made quickly enough. “These officer-involved shootings, justified or not, have forced our City to open its eyes to questions of when and how police use lethal force,” Lee explained. “The progress we’ve made has been meaningful,...

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Fed Up With Officer Violence, San Francisco Residents Go On Hunger Strike Against Police Chief

by CARIMAH TOWNES – “I’ve reached 48 hours now. After the 24-hour mark, you kind of get over the pain of hunger. We get distracted, kind of, with the people that are visiting. We’re trying to stay dry. It was raining last night,” Edwin Lindo told ThinkProgress by phone Friday morning. “I’m hanging in there.” Lindo is one of six hunger strikers currently sitting in front of the Mission Police Station in San Francisco, alongside local rapper Equipto, preschool teacher Maria Cristina Gutierrez, local resident Ike Pinkston, and two others. Lindo, who is also running for District 9 supervisor, is one of the four people who initiated the action on Wednesday in protest of Police Chief Greg Suhr, the embattled leader of the San Francisco Police Department. Under Suhr’s leadership there’s been a spate of fatal police shootings of residents of color, including Mario Woods, Alex Nieto, and Amilcar Perez-Lopez....

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Health Care Isn’t a Bargaining Chip

by Congresswoman Barbara Lee – Conservatives and progressives don’t agree on much these days. Regardless of their party leanings, though, a clear majority of Americans believe that politicians shouldn’t meddle in a woman’s personal health care decisions. Yet for too long, women’s health care has been a political bargaining chip. Anti-choice politicians have worked to ensure that women enrolled in government health plans — including veterans and government employees — don’t get abortion care coverage. That needs to stop. It’s past time to stand up and protect a woman’s access to health care, no matter how she’s insured, where she lives, or what she earns. That’s why I introduced the Equal Access to Abortion Coverage in Health Insurance Act — or the EACH Woman Act — to ensure that politics never comes between a woman and her own personal health decisions. Legislative tactics like the Hyde amendment, which denies many women access...

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Wondering If Solar Is Right for You? Just Ask Google’s ‘Project Sunroof’

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch – Ever wonder how much would you’d save by installing solar panels? Google’s new Project Sunroof will not only answer that question, it’ll also let you know if your roof is right for panels and how to get them installed — simply by entering your address. The project taps into Google’s trove of location and business data. By using the company’s mapping and computing resources, Project Sunroof calculates how much sun hits your roof, the angle of your roof and sun-blocking obstructions such as trees and chimneys. Project Sunroof also calculates how many panels you might need to save on your electric bill and throws in the solar incentives in your area. Use the slider tool to enter your typical electric bill amount to further customize the results. The website also presents users with buying or leasing options for solar panels and suggests a list of local installers....

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An Undocumented Foreigner and a Murder

by Steve Chapman – Does a random killing justify fears of uncontrolled immigration? If you don’t recognize the name Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, don’t worry: You will. He’s not a candidate for president, but before long he’ll have higher name recognition than Jeb Bush. A felon convicted on several drug charges, the Mexican national had been deported five times but managed to get back into the country. He has been arrested for the apparently random murder of 32-year-old Kate Steinle in San Francisco on July 1. For anti-immigration advocates, his case starkly exposes everything that is wrong with our immigration policies. Those flaws would be: First, Lopez-Sanchez was here—illustrating our unwillingness to secure the border. Second, he was (allegedly) violent, proving the danger that unauthorized immigrants pose to American citizens. Third, he was not held for federal immigration agents by the sheriff, an indictment of San Francisco’s “sanctuary city” policy. Donald Trump...

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This Restaurant Pays A $15 Hourly Wage With Health Insurance, A Retirement Plan And Paid Leave

by BRYCE COVERT – Jen Piallat, the owner of Zazie in San Francisco, knows what it’s like to work in the American restaurant industry. “I worked on the restaurant floor for 30 years before I owned my own,” she said. “I didn’t have savings or health insurance until I was 35.” The story is very different for her employees today. She had already offered them 401(k) plans with a match, fully funded health and dental insurance, and paid sick leave. And now she’s gone even further, getting rid of tips in favor of increasing pay and offering even more benefits. At the beginning of the month, the restaurant increased its prices across the board by about 20 percent. She noted some restaurants that have done away with tips have added a mandatory service charge at the bottom of the check instead. “I didn’t want to do that,” she said. “I...

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San Francisco Dismisses 8 Criminal Cases Affected By Vile Police Texts, Many More To Come

by DEBORAH MONTESANO – In March, a federal case against a corrupt San Francisco police officer uncovered racist and homophobic text messages that were sent among 14 officers on the force. The discovery marked the opening of a scandal — and an investigation into how deeply the disgusting, prejudicial attitudes ran in the department. Since then, eight of the officers have been dismissed from the force. The corrupt policeman, Sgt. Ian Furminger, was sentenced to 41 months in prison for stealing money and property from suspects. On Thursday, San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón dismissed eight criminal cases that might have been contaminated by prejudice. The eight are just the beginning of the repercussions. In all, 3000 cases that were handled by one of the 14 implicated officers are being investigated, going back 10 years. Gascón also announced additions to the task force he formed in March. The original goal was to investigate...

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100 Prominent Catholics Urge Pope To Oust Anti-Gay San Francisco Archbishop Cordileone

by librarisingnsf – San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone has been a controversial and divisive Catholic leader in the City since he arrived. His very conservative world view and theology appear not to be a good match for a city as liberal and progressive as San Francisco. And, now about a hundred prominent donors and other members of the Church have asked Pope Francis to replace the archbishop in a full-page ad in the Chronicle. They say that Archbishop Cordileone is fostering “an atmosphere of division and intolerance.” From the SFGate: The plea follows months of dissent within the archdiocese over Cordileone’s emphasis on traditional, conservative church doctrine — including asking high school teachers and staffers at Catholic schools to sign a morality clause that characterizes sex outside of marriage and homosexual relations as “gravely evil.”In their open letter to the pope, Cordileone’s critics say his morality-clause push is mean-spirited and “sets...

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Delphi’s Self-Driving Car Completes US Coast-to-Coast Trip

By Stu Robarts, Gizmag – British-based auto-firm Delphi has completed a journey from San Francisco to New York with its self-driving car. The trip, announced in March, covered nearly 3,400 miles (5,500 km) and took nine days. Delphi says it is the first US coast-to-coast trip ever taken by an automated vehicle. Delphi’s Roadrunner car set of with a group of engineers from Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay on March 22. The subsequent journey took it through 15 states and the District of Columbia. The Roadrunner was faced with a wide variety of driving situations to navigate during the trip, including traffic circles, construction zones, bridges, tunnels, aggressive drivers and differing weather conditions. Although an engineer was in the driving seat ready to take control if needed, Delphi says the car undertook 99 percent of the drive in fully automated mode. The vehicle is equipped with numerous...

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How Paid Sick Days Are Benefiting Jersey City’s Businesses

By BRYCE COVERT, Think Progress – At the end of 2013, Jersey City became the sixth city in the country to pass a paid sick leave requirement, which went into effect in January of 2014. Since then, the city’s employers report they’ve experienced a variety of benefits, according to a study from the Center for Women and Work at Rutgers University. Researchers polled 289 employers in the city at the beginning of this year. Of the businesses that changed their sick leave policies after the law was enacted, more than 40 percent reported seeing a benefit: a third saw an improvement in job applicants, nearly 32 percent saw increased productivity, and just under 10 percent saw a drop in turnover. Turnover in particular can be very expensive, costing as much as 20 percent of a worker’s salary to replace him. “Though the short time span since the adoption of the...

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Bernie Sanders Says Banks Are Too Big To Fail Because Their CEOs Are ‘Too Big To Jail’

by RYAN DENSON – In 2013, as the United States recession was cooling and hope seemed to be coming back into the minds of Americans, their attitudes towards the ‘too big to fail’ and ‘too big to jail’ CEOs were still at a boil. And rightfully so. In a Reuter’s poll, in which 1,400 Americans were surveyed, fifty-three percent thought that not enough was done to prosecute bankers for their role in the financial crisis while 15 percent were satisfied with basically getting no indictments. That was in 2013, and since then, things have gotten better. But make no mistake, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has no problem reminding us of the cold hard truth that Americans thought in 2013: the reason we were in this mess in the first place was because banks are too big to fail. And why is that? Because their CEOs are too big to jail. Speaking to the...

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