Biking Is Faster Than Driving in These Major Cities

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch – For those of you who constantly battle with bumper-to-bumper commutes, have you ever wondered if it would be better to ditch your car and walk to your destination instead? The answer, according to a fascinating article from Scientific American′s Tali Trigg, is probably not if you move at the average walking speed of 3.1 mph. The energy and transport analyst based his article on INRIX’s data on the speeds of the worst traffic corridors during peak hours in the U.S.: Austin, Texas: 6 mph Cincinnati, Ohio: 9 mph Los Angeles, California: 8 mph New York, New York: 7, 8, 8 mph (three corridors) Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: 8 mph The conclusion is that vehicular traffic — even in the country’s most congested areas — moves at least twice as fast as walking. One city where walking might be the better option is in New Delhi, India where...

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Budget Cuts Don’t Save Money

by Dave Johnson – Cutting federal spending doesn’t “save money” – certainly not the way conservatives in Congress and in the states have been doing it. If you cut the Internal Revenue Service budget, that obviously increases the deficit because it lowers the government’s ability to collect tax revenue. If you cut the infrastructure budget, obviously after a while bridges start to fall down. That costs money. And lives. And, of course, if you cut the health and research budgets, diseases can spread and cures are not found. An article in Scientific American magazine by an infectious disease specialist spells out the consequences as the United States deals with the threat of the Ebola virus: NIH’s budget was reduced by $446 million from 2010 to 2014, and subjected to inappropriate politically motivated interference in its decision making. The CDC’s discretionary funding was...

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What Happened When Police Started Wearing Cameras In Realto, California?

by Nathaniel Downes – When police arrest people, they are read their miranda rights. But in the city of Rialto, California, they hear something else added to their interactions with police officers. “You are being videotaped.” The police chief of Rialto, California, William Farrar, helped oversee the outfitting of all 66 police officers with cameras for use while they are on duty. When you put a camera on a police officer, they tend to behave a little better, follow the rules a little better. And if a citizen knows the officer is wearing a camera, chances are the citizen will behave a little better. This may sound strange, but in reality, it is scientific. The act of observation changes the observed, as first demonstrated on the quantum level by Werner Heisenberg. As reported in Scientific American, even the illusion of observation causes people, on a subconcious level, to behave better....

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Scientific American editor goes on Fox, but asked not to mention climate change

Scientific American editor Michael Moyer was invited to appear on Fox  with one major caveat. by Hunter – Scientific American editor Michael Moyer was invited to appear on Fox  with one major caveat. About the only interesting thing that the scientific community is sure will happen in the next 50 years is that climate change is going to get worse, and that we’re going to have to deal with the impacts. So I put that as one of my talking points.I understood that there was little chance the topic would make it into the show, but I’m not going to self-censor myself from the get-go. I also included as talking points some topics that we have recently covered in the magazine: robot drivers, gene therapy and rocket technology. The Fox producer came back and very politely and matter-of-factly said that we would have to replace the climate change item. Well,...

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