Which Country Will Be First to Go Completely Underwater Due to Climate Change?

By Cole Mellino, EcoWatch – This country, The Maldives, “could become the first state in history to be completely erased by the sea,” says Evan Puschak of the Seeker Network. It’s the planet’s lowest country. “On average, it’s only five feet above sea level,” says Puschak. If the oceans continue to rise, as predicted, 77 percent of this country will be under water by the end of the century. If the rate of rise increases even more, as a new study suggests, the country could even be submerged by 2085. And it’s not alone, many other low-lying island nations face a similar fate. Find out which country could be under water in our lifetime: It’s not just low-lying island nations either. “A recent study says we can expect the oceans to rise between 2.5 and 6.5 feet (0.8 and 2 meters) by 2100, enough to swamp many of the cities along...

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Global Warming Is Slowing Ocean Currents Causing Dire Consequences, Expert Warns

By Cole Mellino , EcoWatch – Climate scientists Michael Mann and Stefan Rahmstorf announced the findings of their new study yesterday, which shows that the rapid melting of the polar ice has slowed down currents in the Atlantic Ocean, particularly since 1970. The scientists say “the slowdown in ocean currents will result in sea level rise in cities like New York and Boston, and temperature changes on both sides of the Atlantic,” reports NPR’s Jeremy Hobson. Mann, who is a professor and the director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University, joined Hobson yesterday on Here and Now to discuss the study and the implications of its findings. Mann explains the consequences of the Gulf Stream shutting down and how it would drastically alter the climate in Europe and North America. The last time this happened, about 12,000 years ago, at the end of the last ice age, North America and Europe went back...

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Rising Waters, Rising Threat

How Climate Change Endangers America’s Neglected Wastewater Infrastructure By Ben Bovarnick, Shiva Polefka, and Arpita Bhattacharyya, Center for American Progress – The second anniversary of Superstorm Sandy recalls the tragic loss of 117 lives across eight states, evoking images of flooded streets, power outages, and stranded communities. The storm also caused significant damage away from news cameras — underground and offshore — to wastewater infrastructure. Sandy’s powerful rainfall and record-setting storm surge overwhelmed wastewater systems throughout coastal New York and New Jersey, resulting in the overflow of almost 11 billion gallons of raw sewage into the stricken region’s streets, rivers, and coastal waters. This was enough untreated effluent to fill the Empire State Building 14 times. Unfortunately, wastewater overflow is not unique to superstorms or to the East Coast. As climate change strains aging sewer systems around the country through increasingly severe weather and sea-level rise, the resilience of...

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